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Department of Plant Sciences

 
Read more at: New imaging protocol to help identify drought-tolerant plants
Drought treated plants in pots under the new remote sensing system

New imaging protocol to help identify drought-tolerant plants

3 February 2023

Standardised, low-cost, widely-applicable protocol eliminates common methodological error and improves data quality and reproducibility. A new protocol for monitoring water stress in pot-grown plants has been develop by Daniel Ginzburg, PhD student and scientist in the department and at the Carnegie Institution for Science...


Read more at: Cambridge-led consortium receives $35m to boost crop production sustainably in sub-Saharan Africa
Scientist in wheat field

Cambridge-led consortium receives $35m to boost crop production sustainably in sub-Saharan Africa

31 January 2023

A Cambridge-led consortium has received US$35m (£28m) over five years to develop sustainable solutions to increasing the yields of small-scale farmers in sub-Saharan Africa, without the need for costly and polluting inorganic fertilisers. The grant, from Bill & Melinda Gates Agricultural Innovations (Gates Ag One)...


Read more at: Low-cost sensor enables continuous monitoring of pH in tomato xylem sap
tomatoes

Low-cost sensor enables continuous monitoring of pH in tomato xylem sap

23 January 2023

Precision agriculture enables farmers to closely monitor the status of their crops (such as nutrients, pests and diseases, and water stress) in real time, and use that information to apply just the right amount of management input in the right place to ensure the plant grows optimally. Such practices help ensure resources...


Read more at: New model increases vegetation prediction accuracy in Himalayan glacier melt zones
Vegetation vertical line shift in the Himalaya graphic

New model increases vegetation prediction accuracy in Himalayan glacier melt zones

16 January 2023

New model increases vegetation prediction accuracy in Himalayan glacier melt zones Greening dominated by grasslands as vegetation line shifts upwards by 7 – 28 m each year. Climate warming has long been known to cause glaciers to melt and ‘retreat’ up the mountain to higher altitudes, leaving land that had been under ice...


Read more at: Mysterious parasite: How plants develop parasitic organs
Dodder on tomato plants

Mysterious parasite: How plants develop parasitic organs

9 January 2023

Mysterious parasite: How plants develop parasitic organs


Read more at: New funding to help University Herbarium identify and digitise globally-important specimens
Type specimen of Amaryllis banksiana

New funding to help University Herbarium identify and digitise globally-important specimens

22 December 2022

New funding to help University Herbarium identify and digitise globally-important specimens Cambridge University Herbarium’s new grant from the Isaac Newton Trust will fund a Special Collections Researcher to focus on identifying a significant proportion of the estimated 50,000 type specimens held in this extraordinary...


Read more at: The Tulip hunter of Toktogul

The Tulip hunter of Toktogul

10 December 2022

Brett Wilson's love of wild tulips has taken him to some of the most spectacular places in Central Asia, where he discovered a new species in Toktogul, Kyrgyzstan. His work has helped to uncover the plight of 53 tulips which have been added to the 'Red List' of threatened species. https://www.cam.ac.uk/this-cambridge-life/...


Read more at: New UAV-based system enables efficient forest restoration monitoring

New UAV-based system enables efficient forest restoration monitoring

1 December 2022

New UAV-based system enables efficient forest restoration monitoring Ecologists at the Conservation Research Institute have developed a new method of mapping early successional species in tropical forests using Unoccupied Ariel Vehicles (UAVs) to generate reference crown images with attached GPS, a system that will enable...


Read more at: Plants employ chemical engineering to manufacture bee-luring optical devices

Plants employ chemical engineering to manufacture bee-luring optical devices

24 November 2022

Plants employ chemical engineering to manufacture bee-luring optical devices Cambridge researchers have shown that plants can regulate the chemistry of their petal surface to create iridescent signals visible to bees. While most flowers produce pigments that appear colourful and act as a visual cue to pollinators, some...


Read more at: Modelling the future of soils in the world’s savanna-grasslands

Modelling the future of soils in the world’s savanna-grasslands

22 November 2022

Modelling the future of soils in the world’s savanna-grasslands – new tools to help manage 24 million square km of drylands A new grant from the ERC's ‘Starting Grants’ scheme will fund studies to improve carbon credit schemes in dryland areas by boosting our grasp of the effects of periodic fire events on carbon capture...